Select Page
Unmatched flexibility in online ion analysis: The 2060 IC Process Analyzer

Unmatched flexibility in online ion analysis: The 2060 IC Process Analyzer

When discussing chemical analysis, the first thing that comes to mind is a chemist working in the laboratory analyzing a sample.

However, in the industrial process world chemical analysis is a much more complicated affair. In the metalworking industry for example, corrosion is a complex problem. The conventional approach (offline analysis systems) is costly, and a more proactive approach is needed for prevention, identification, and manufacturing of high quality metalworking products. Therefore, a more comprehensive sample monitoring and analysis approach is necessary in order to comply with such requirements.

While offline analysis systems depend upon an analyst to collect and process samples, an online analysis system allows for continuous monitoring of multiple parameters in real time without being dependent on an analyst.

Need to refresh your knowledge about the differences between online, inline, and atline analysis? Read our blog post: «We are pioneers: Metrohm Process Analytics».

The implementation of Process Analytical Technologies (PAT) provides a detailed representation in real time of the actual conditions within a process. As a complete solution provider, Metrohm Process Analytics offers the best solutions for online chemical analysis. We seek to optimize process analysis by developing flexible, modular process analyzers that allow multiple analyses of different analytes from a representative sample taken directly at the process site.

Want to learn more about PAT? Check out our article series here: «To automate or not to automate? Advantages of PAT – Part 1».

2060 IC Process Analyzer

With more than 40 years of experience with online process analysis, Metrohm Process Analytics has always been committed to innovation. In 2001, the first modular IC system was developed at Metrohm and it was a success. In the past several years Metrohm Process Analytics focused on implementing more modular flexibility in their products, which resulted in the introduction of the next generation of Process Ion Chromatographs: the 2060 IC Process Analyzer (Figure 1) in 2019. It is built using two 930 Compact IC Flex systems and is in full synergy with the Metrohm process analyzer portfolio (such as the 2060 Process Analyzer).

Figure 1. The 2060 IC Process Analyzer from Metrohm Process Analytics. Pictured here is the touchscreen human interface, the analytical wet part (featuring additional sample preparation modules – top inlay, and the integrated IC – bottom inlay), and a reagent cabinet.

For more background behind the development of IC solutions for the process world, check out our previous blog posts featuring the past of the 2060 IC Process Analyzer:

Using the 2060 platform, modularity is taken to the next step. Configurations of up to four wet part cabinets allow numerous combinations of multiple analysis modules for multiparameter measurements on multiple process streams, making this analyzer unequal to any other on the market.

This modular architecture gives the additional possibility to place separate cabinets in different locations around a production site for a wide angle view of the process. For example, the 2060 IC Process Analyzer can be set up at different locations to prevent corrosion on the water steam cycles in fossil and nuclear power plants.

The 2060 IC Process Analyzer is managed using flexible software enabling straightforward efficient control and programming options. With multiple types of detectors available from Metrohm, high precision analysis of a wide spectrum of analytes is possible in parallel.

The inclusion of an optional (pressureless) ultrapure water system for autonomous operation and reliable trace analysis also benefits users by providing continuous eluent production possibilities for unattended operation (Figure 2).

Finally, the well-known Metrohm Inline Sample Preparation (MISP) techniques are an added bonus for process engineers for repeatable, fully automated preparation of challenging sample matrices.

Figure 2. Continuous eluent production integrated in the 2060 IC Process Analyzer.

Top applications

The collection of samples and process data, including corrosion prevention and control indicators, is critical for efficient plant management in many industries. In order to prevent unscheduled plant shutdowns, accidents, and damage to company assets, process engineers rely on their colleagues in the lab to pinpoint corrosion problems. One of the most effective ways to bridge laboratory analyses to the process environment is to employ real-time analysis monitoring.

Figure 3. Product and process optimization differences between offline, atline, online, and inline analysis.

Optimal online corrosion management

Be it quantifying the harmful corrosive ions (e.g., chlorides, sulfates, or organic acids), measuring corrosion inhibitors (e.g., ammonia, amines, and film-forming amines), or detecting corrosion products, the 2060 IC Process Analyzer is the ideal solution for 24/7 unattended analysis.

In a nuclear power plant, this analyzer can measure a number of analytes including inorganic anions, organic cations, and aliphatic amines to ensure a thorough understanding of corrosive indications without needing multiple instruments.

Figure 4. Water sample from the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor containing 2 g/L H3BO3 and 3.3 mg/L LiOH spiked with 2 μg/L anions (preconcentration volume: 2000 μL).
Figure 5. Simulated sample from the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor containing 2 g/L H3BO3 and 3.3 mg/L LiOH spiked with 2 μg/L nickel, zinc, calcium, and magnesium (preconcentration volume: 1000 μL).

Providing quick, reliable results, this system gives valuable insight into the status of corrosion processes within a plant by continuous comparison of results with control values. By correlating the results with specific events, effective corrective action can quickly be undertaken to prevent or minimize plant downtime.

For more information about the determination of anions and cations in the primary circuit of nuclear power plants with the 2060 IC Process Analyzer, download our free Application Notes below.

Online drinking water analysis

In drinking water plants and beverage bottling companies, determination of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) like bromate is crucial due to their carcinogenic properties. The carcinogen bromate (BrO3) has a recommended concentration limit of 10 μg/L of in drinking water set by the World Health Organization.

Nowadays, ion chromatography has been proven to be the best routine analysis method for water analysis, due to its possibility of automated sample preparation, various separation mechanisms, and different types of detectors. Some of the analytical standards that support this include: EPA 300.1EPA 321.8, ASTM D6581, ISO 11206, and ISO 15061.

The 2060 IC Process Analyzer can monitor trace levels of bromate in drinking water online, meaning higher throughput, less time spent performing manual laboratory tests, and better quality drinking water.

Figure 6. Drinking water sample, spiked with 10 μg/L each of chlorite, bromate, chlorate, 40 μg/L each of nitrate, bromide, 100 μg/L phosphate, and 500 μg/L dichloroacetate.
Figure 7. Analysis of a mineral water sample spiked with 0.5 μg/L bromate.

To learn more about the online analysis of bromate in drinking water with the 2060 IC Process Analyzer, download our free Application Note.

Monitoring aerosols and gases in air

Approximately 92% of the world population lives in places where the World Health Organization air quality guideline levels are not met. Air pollution can exacerbate preexisting health conditions and shorten lifespans. It has even been suggested as a link to infertility causes. Hence, understanding the impact of air pollution and air constituents on the environment and our wellbeing is of great significance.

Air pollution is caused not only by gaseous compounds, but also by aerosols and particulate matter (PM). These extremely fine particles enter and damage the lungs; from them, ultrafine particles can spread across the body through the blood cells and cause symptoms of inflammation. While these risks are being debated and researched actively around the world, it is still not known which compounds actually cause harm.

As a result, there is a great need for more specific data on long-term measurements. Fast analytical methods and real-time measurements of concentrations of chemical compounds in ambient air are important and should make it possible to better understand the circumstances and effects.

For optimal air quality monitoring, the gas and aerosol composition of the surrounding air has to be analyzed practically simultaneously as well as continuously, which is possible via inline analysis with ion chromatography.

Metrohm Process Analytics offers the 2060 MARGA (Monitor for AeRosols and Gases in ambient Air) which thanks to its dual-channel ion chromatograph, can automatically analyze the ions from the collected gas and aerosol samples.

If you want to learn more background behind the development of the 2060 MARGA, check out our previous blog post: History of Metrohm IC – Part 5.

For a full list of free downloadable 2060 IC applications, visit our website and check out the Metrohm Application Finder!

Free Application Notes

For the 2060 IC Process Analyzer

Post written by Andrea Ferreira, Technical Writer at Metrohm Applikon, Schiedam, The Netherlands.

History of Metrohm IC – Part 5

History of Metrohm IC – Part 5

In the fifth part in our ongoing series about the history of ion chromatography development at Metrohm, we now focus on automated air quality monitoring with the 2060 MARGA instrument.

Did you miss the other parts in this series? Find them here!

The importance of clean air cannot be understated. Air pollution is one of the major environmental risks to human health; it can cause strokes, heart disease, lung cancer, and both chronic and acute respiratory diseases. Additionally, the contribution of such pollution to climate change is of significant scientific interest.

Monitoring air quality is of increasing concern, and thankfully more and more companies are taking responsibility for their input and looking for ways to measure and mitigate their environmental contribution.

What is MARGA?

MARGA (Monitor for AeRosols and Gases in ambient Air) was developed in the 1990s by Metrohm Process Analytics in cooperation with the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) (Figure 1).

Figure 1. The original MARGA 1S air monitoring system, developed in the 1990s by Metrohm Process Analytics.

This instrument application offered a new approach in which gases and aerosols sampled from the same air mass are separated from each other by selectively dissolving them in water. The resulting solutions (available every hour) are then analyzed using ion chromatography with conductivity detection. Separating the two fractions from each other allows for the detection of important precursor gases and ionic species found in the aerosols.

Collection of water-soluble ions and analysis by ion chromatography:
  • Gases: HCl, HNO3, HNO2, SO2, NH3
  • Aerosols: Cl, NO3, SO42-, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, *F

*also possible with the 2060 MARGA (Figure 2)

This new analyzer application was a huge success at that time. However, in the meantime Metrohm Process Analytics was busy implementing more modular flexibility to their process analyzers. That’s why in 2018, based on the all-new 2060 online analysis platform from Metrohm Process Analytics, the 2060 MARGA (Figure 2) was introduced.

To learn more about how MARGA is used in real life situations, download our free technical notes on the Metrohm website.

Figure 2. The Metrohm Process Analytics solution to unattended, automated air quality analysis: the 2060 MARGA M.

Featuring state of the art 2060 software to automate analysis 24/7, brand new hardware adaptable for modular flexibility, and the dependable and well-known MagIC Net software, the 2060 MARGA is the right solution to gain insight of the effects of particulate matter on health and the environment. This instrument is available in two versions:

2060 MARGA M (Monitoring)

The 2060 MARGA M (Figure 2) is ideal for unattended routine monitoring at a permanent site.

Everything is packed into a single instrument, with separate subcabinets for the sample collection wet part, ion analysis cabinet (with two IC channels and column oven for anion and cation determinations), plus reagent containers with level sensors.

2060 MARGA R (Research)

A flexible version, ideal for research applications, features the 2060 user interface and sample collection wet part.

Sample analysis is carried out on a stand-alone Metrohm 940 Professional IC Vario TWO/SeS/PP, including sequential suppression for the anion analysis channel. Installed on-site for a limited time campaign, the 2060 MARGA R works unattended in the same way as the 2060 MARGA M. When not required for field use, the 940 Ion Chromatograph can be put to work in the laboratory, using an external PC and MagIC Net, to run any of the multitude of applications available from Metrohm.

Figure 3. The 2060 MARGA offers hourly data and easy to read trend charts for a full overview of gas and aerosol analysis.

The 2060 MARGA is designed for monitoring in remote locations but it’s never far from home. By using a direct internet connection, the 2060 MARGA performance can be checked remotely, adjustments can be made, and results can be evaluated at any time.

Monitoring air quality around the world

MARGA systems from Metrohm have been used by many official agencies and research organizations globally to monitor air quality in a completely autonomous way.

Figure 4. World map showing the locations of installed MARGA instruments from Metrohm Process Analytics.
Scotland

The MARGA participated in a program focusing on measurement and evaluation of the long-range, transboundary transmission of air-polluting substances in Europe (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme, «EMEP»). 

This research was performed in Auchencorth Moss, approximately 20 kilometers south of Edinburgh in Scotland, with the objective of analyzing to what degree crops and natural ecosystems, as well as the rural population, are exposed to airborne pollutants.

Learn more about this application here.

Netherlands

Fireworks are full of water-soluble ions and trace metals. The different colors are produced through the combustion of these chemical compounds. After combustion, the air is full of toxic gases and particles which can linger for a significant time, depending on weather patterns.

The 2060 MARGA can determine detailed gas and aerosol concentrations on an hourly basis completely autonomously, offering valuable scientific information about the effect of fireworks on local air quality (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Air pollution due to New Year’s Eve fireworks celebrations in the Netherlands: aerosol concentrations of selected compounds.

For more information about this application, download our free technical note here.

If you would like to read more scientific literature featuring the MARGA, please download our free overview: Air monitoring with ion chromatography: An overview of the literature references.

Download our free monograph:

Practical Ion Chromatography – An Introduction

Post written by Andrea Ferreira (Technical Writer at Metrohm Applikon, Schiedam, The Netherlands) and Dr. Alyson Lanciki (Scientific Editor at Metrohm International Headquarters).

«Analyze This»: 2020 in review

«Analyze This»: 2020 in review

I wanted to end 2020 by thanking all of you for making «Analyze This» – the Metrohm blog for chemists such a success! For our 60th blog post, I’d like to look back and focus on the wealth of interesting topics we have published this year. There is truly something for everyone: it doesn’t matter whether your lab focuses on titration or spectroscopic techniques, or analyzes water samples or illicit substances – we’ve got you covered! If you’re looking to answer your most burning chemical analysis questions, we have FAQs and other series full of advice from the experts. Or if you’re just in the mood to learn something new in a few minutes, there are several posts about the chemical world to discover.

We love to hear back from you as well. Leaving comments on your favorite blog posts or contacting us through social media are great ways to voice your opinion—we at Metrohm are here for you!

Finally, I wish you and your families a safe, restful holiday season. «Analyze This» will return on January 11, 2021, so subscribe if you haven’t already done so, and bookmark this page for an overview of all of our articles grouped by topic!

Stay healthy, and stay curious.

Best wishes,

Dr. Alyson Lanciki, Scientific Editor, Metrohm AG

Quickly jump directly to any section by clicking a topic:

Customer Stories

We are curious by nature, and enjoy hearing about the variety of projects where our products are being used! For some examples of interesting situations where Metrohm analytical equipment is utilized, read on.

From underwater archaeological research to orbiting Earth on the International Space Station, Metrohm is there! We assist on all types of projects, like brewing top quality beers and even growing antibiotic-free shrimp – right here in Switzerland.

Interested in being featured? Contact your local Metrohm dealer for details!

Titration

Metrohm is the global market leader in analytical instruments for titration. Who else is better then to advise you in this area? Our experts are eager to share their knowledge with you, and show this with the abundance of topics they have contributed this year to our blog.

For more in-depth information about obtaining the most accurate pH measurements, take a look at our FAQ about pH calibration or read about avoiding the most common mistakes in pH measurement. You may pick up a few tips!

Choose the best electrode for your needs and keep it in top condition with our best practices, and then learn how to standardize titrant properly. Better understand what to consider during back-titration, check out thermometric titration and its advantages and applications, or read about the most common challenges and how to overcome them when carrying out complexometric titrations

If you are interested in improving your conductivity measurements, measuring dissolved oxygen, or the determination of oxidation in edible fats and oils, check out these blog posts and download our free Application Notes and White Papers!

Finally, this article about comprehensive water analysis with a combination of titration and ion chromatography explains the many benefits for laboratories with large sample loads. The history behind the TitrIC analysis system used for these studies can be found in a separate blog post.

Karl Fischer Titration

Metrohm and Karl Fischer titration: a long history of success. Looking back on more than half a century of experience in KFT, Metrohm has shaped what coulometric and volumetric water analysis are today.

Aside from the other titration blog posts, our experts have also written a 2-part series including 20 of the most frequently asked questions for KFT arranged into three categories: instrument preparation and handling, titration troubleshooting, and the oven technique. Our article about how to properly standardize Karl Fischer titrant will take you step by step through the process to obtain correct results.

For more specific questions, read about the oven method for sample preparation, or which is the best technique to choose when measuring moisture in certain situations: Karl Fischer titration, near-infrared spectroscopy, or both?

Ion Chromatography (IC)

Ion chromatography has been a part of the Metrohm portfolio since the late 1980s. From routine IC analysis to research and development, and from stand-alone analyzers to fully automated systems, Metrohm has provided IC solutions for all situations. If you’re curious about the backstory of R&D, check out the ongoing series about the history of IC at Metrohm.

Metrohm IC user sitting at a laboratory bench.

Common questions for users are answered in blog posts about IC column tips and tricks and Metrohm inline ultrafiltration. Clear calculations showing how to increase productivity and profitability in environmental analysis with IC perfectly complement our article about comprehensive water analysis using IC and titration together for faster sample throughput.

On the topic of foods and beverages, you can find out how to determine total sulfite faster and easier than ever, measure herbicides in drinking water, or even learn how Metrohm IC is used in Switzerland to grow shrimp!

Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS)

Metrohm NIRS analyzers for the lab and for process analysis enable you to perform routine analysis quickly and with confidence – without requiring sample preparation or additional reagents and yielding results in less than a minute. Combining visible (Vis) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, these analyzers are capable of performing qualitative analysis of various materials and quantitative analysis of a number of physical and chemical parameters in one run.

Our experts have written all about the benefits of NIR spectroscopy in a 4-part series, which includes an explanation of the advantages of NIRS over conventional wet chemical analysis methods, differences between NIR and IR spectroscopy, how to implement NIRS in your laboratory workflow, and examples of how pre-calibrations make implementation even quicker.

A comparison between NIRS and the Karl Fischer titration method for moisture analysis is made in a dedicated article.

A 2-part FAQ about NIRS has also been written in a collaboration between our laboratory and process analysis colleagues, covering all kinds of questions related to both worlds.

Raman Spectroscopy

This latest addition to the Metrohm family expands the Metrohm portfolio to include novel, portable instruments for materials identification and verification. We offer both Metrohm Raman as well as B&W Tek products to cover a variety of needs and requirements.

Here you can find out some of the history of Raman spectroscopy including the origin story behind Mira, the handheld Raman instrument from Metrohm Raman. For a real-world situation involving methamphetamine identification by law enforcement and first responders, read about Mira DS in action – detecting drugs safely in the field.

Mira - handheld Raman keeping you safe in hazardous situations.

Are you looking for an easier way to detect food fraud? Our article about Misa describes its detection capabilities and provides several free Application Notes for download.

Process Analytics

We cater to both: the laboratory and the production floor. The techniques and methods for laboratory analysis are also available for automated in-process analysis with the Metrohm Process Analytics brand of industrial process analyzers.

Learn about how Metrohm became pioneers in the process world—developing the world’s first online wet chemistry process analyzer, and find out how Metrohm’s modular IC expertise has been used to push the limits in the industrial process optimization.

Additionally, a 2-part FAQ has been written about near-infrared spectroscopy by both laboratory and process analysis experts, which is helpful when starting out or even if you’re an advanced user.

Finally, we offer a 3-part series about the advantages of process analytical technology (PAT) covering the topics of process automation advantages, digital networking of production plants, and error and risk minimization in process analysis.

Voltammetry (VA)

Voltammetry is an electrochemical method for the determination of trace and ultratrace concentrations of heavy metals and other electrochemically active substances. Both benchtop and portable options are available with a variety of electrodes to choose from, allowing analysis in any situation.

A 5-part series about solid-state electrodes covers a range of new sensors suitable for the determination of «heavy metals» using voltammetric methods. This series offers information and example applications for the Bi drop electrode, scTrace Gold electrode (as well as a modified version), screen-printed electrodes, and the glassy carbon rotating disc electrode.

Come underwater with Metrohm and Hublot in our blog post as they try to find the missing pieces of the ancient Antikythera Mechanism in Greece with voltammetry.

If you’d like to learn about the combination of voltammetry with ion chromatography and the expanded application capabilities, take a look at our article about combined analysis techniques.

Electrochemistry (EC)

Electrochemistry plays an important role in groundbreaking technologies such as battery research, fuel cells, and photovoltaics. Metrohm’s electrochemistry portfolio covers everything from potentiostats/galvanostats to accessories and software.

Our two subsidiaries specializing in electrochemistry, Metrohm Autolab (Utrecht, Netherlands) and Metrohm DropSens (Asturias, Spain) develop and produce a comprehensive portfolio of electrochemistry equipment.

This year, the COVID-19 pandemic has been at the top of the news, and with it came the discussion of testing – how reliable or accurate was the data? In our blog post about virus detection with screen-printed electrodes, we explain the differences between different testing methods and their drawbacks, the many benefits of electrochemical testing methods, and provide a free informative White Paper for interested laboratories involved in this research.

Our electrochemistry instruments have also gone to the International Space Station as part of a research project to more efficiently recycle water on board spacecraft for long-term missions.

The History of…

Stories inspire people, illuminating the origins of theories, concepts, and technologies that we may have become to take for granted. Metrohm aims to inspire chemists—young and old—to be the best and never stop learning. Here, you can find our blog posts that tell the stories behind the scenes, including the Metrohm founder Bertold Suhner.

Bertold Suhner, founder of Metrohm.

For more history behind the research and development behind Metrohm products, take a look at our series about the history of IC at Metrohm, or read about how Mira became mobile. If you are more interested in process analysis, then check out the story about the world’s first process analyzer, built by Metrohm Process Analytics.

Need something lighter? Then the 4-part history of chemistry series may be just what you’re looking for.

Specialty Topics

Some articles do not fit neatly into the same groups as the rest, but are nonetheless filled with informative content! Here you can find an overview of Metrohm’s free webinars, grouped by measurement technique.

If you work in a regulated industry such as pharmaceutical manufacturing or food and beverage production, don’t miss our introduction to Analytical Instrument Qualification and what it can mean for consumer safety!

Industry-focused

Finally, if you are more interested in reading articles related to the industry you work in, here are some compilations of our blog posts in various areas including pharmaceutical, illicit substances, food and beverages, and of course water analysis. More applications and information can be found on our website.

Food and beverages
All of these products can be measured for total sulfite content.

Oxidation stability is an estimate of how quickly a fat or oil will become rancid. It is a standard parameter of quality control in the production of oils and fats in the food industry or for the incoming goods inspection in processing facilities. To learn more about how to determine if your edible oils are rancid, read our blog post.

Determining total sulfite in foods and beverages has never been faster or easier than with our IC method. Read on about how to perform this notoriously frustrating analysis and get more details in our free LC/GC The Column article available for download within.

Measuring the true sodium content in foodstuff directly and inexpensively is possible using thermometric titration, which is discussed in more detail here. To find out the best way to determine moisture content in foods, our experts have written a blog post about the differences between Karl Fischer titration and near-infrared spectroscopy methods.

To determine if foods, beverages, spices, and more are adulterated, you no longer have to wait for the lab. With Misa, it is possible to measure a variety of illicit substances in complex matrices within minutes, even on the go.

All of these products can be measured for total sulfite content.

Making high quality products is a subject we are passionate about. This article discusses improving beer brewing practices and focuses on the tailor-made system built for Feldschlösschen, Switzerland’s largest brewer.

Pharmaceutical / healthcare

Like the food sector, pharmaceutical manufacturing is a very tightly regulated industry. Consumer health is on the line if quality drops.

Ensuring that the analytical instruments used in the production processes are professionally qualified is a must, especially when auditors come knocking. Find out more about this step in our blog post about Analytical Instrument Qualification (AIQ).

Moisture content in the excipients, active ingredients, and in the final product is imperative to measure. This can be accomplished with different analytical methods, which we compare and contrast for you here.

The topic of virus detection has been on the minds of everyone this year. In this blog post, we discuss virus detection based on screen-printed electrodes, which are a more cost-effective and customizable option compared to other conventional techniques.

Water analysis

Water is our business. From trace analysis up to high concentration determinations, Metrohm has you covered with a variety of analytical measurement techniques and methods developed by the experts.

Learn how to increase productivity and profitability in environmental analysis laboratories with IC with a real life example and cost calculations, or read about how one of our customers in Switzerland uses automated Metrohm IC to monitor the water quality in shrimp breeding pools.

If heavy metal analysis is what you are interested in, then you may find our 5-part series about trace analysis with solid-state electrodes very handy.

Unwanted substances may find their way into our water supply through agricultural practices. Find out an easier way to determine herbicides in drinking water here!

Water is arguably one of the most important ingredients in the brewing process. Determination of major anions and cations along with other parameters such as alkalinity are described in our blog post celebrating International Beer Day.

All of these products can be measured for total sulfite content.
Illicit / harmful substances

When you are unsure if your expensive spices are real or just a colored powder, if your dairy products have been adulterated with melamine, or fruits and vegetables were sprayed with illegal pesticides, it’s time to test for food fraud. Read our blog post about simple, fast determination of illicit substances in foods and beverages for more information.

Detection of drugs, explosives, and other illegal substances can be performed safely by law enforcement officers and first responders without the need for a lab or chemicals with Mira DS. Here you can read about a real life training to identify a methamphetamine laboratory.

Drinking water regulations are put in place by authorities out of concern for our health. Herbicides are important to measure in our drinking water as they have been found to be carcinogenic in many instances.

Post written by Dr. Alyson Lanciki, Scientific Editor at Metrohm International Headquarters, Herisau, Switzerland.

Frequently asked questions in near-infrared spectroscopy analysis – Part 2

Frequently asked questions in near-infrared spectroscopy analysis – Part 2

Whether you are new to the technique, a seasoned veteran, or merely just curious about near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), Metrohm is here to help you to learn all about how to perform the best analysis possible with your instruments.

In this series, we will cover several frequently asked questions regarding both our laboratory NIRS instruments as well as our line of Process Analysis NIRS products.

Did you miss Part 1 in this series? Find it here!

1. What are typical detection limits for liquid samples and for solid samples?

The detection limit varies depending on the substance analyzed, the complexity of the sample matrix, and the sensitivity of both the reference and NIR technology used. NIR spectroscopy systems using dispersive technology are the most sensitive. Using such a system to analyze a simple sample in which the parameter of interest is a strong absorber will allow low detection limits.

For example, water in solvents can be detected down to about 10 mg/L in both offline and online/inline measurements. For more complex matrices (e.g., solids and slurries), detection limits are about 1000 mg/L (0.1%).

For more information about the differences between solid and liquid samples for NIRS analysis, as well as the different methods best suited for such matrices, read our blog post «Benefits of NIR spectroscopy: Part 1» here!

2. What accuracy can I achieve with NIR spectroscopy?

The accuracy of a near-infrared spectroscopic method depends on the accuracy of the reference/primary method. A highly accurate primary method will result in the development of a highly accurate NIR method, while a less accurate primary method lowers the accuracy of the related NIR method. This is because the NIR data and primary data are correlated in the prediction model. A good prediction model will have approximately 1.1x the accuracy of the primary method over the prediction range.

The development of prediction models has been described in detail in our previous blog article: «Benefits of NIR spectroscopy: Part 3».

3. How are instruments calibrated and how often do I need to recalibrate an instrument?

Instruments are calibrated using certified NIST standards. For dispersive systems measuring in reflection mode, NIST SRM 1920 standards are used to calibrate the wavelength / wavenumber axis. Certified reflection standards with a defined reflectance made of ceramic can be used to calibrate the absorbance axis.

In transmission mode, typically NIST SRM 2065 or 2035 are used for the wavelength / wavenumber calibration, and air for the absorbance axis.

A calibration should be performed after each hardware modification (e.g., lamp exchange) and annually as part of a service interval. Ideally, the spectroscopy software guides user through the complete calibration processes.

Find the calibration tools for your Metrohm NIRS instruments here!

Metrohm NIRS reflection standard, set of 2.

4. How do I validate my instrument and how frequently should validation be done?

The Metrohm NIRS DS2500 Solid Analyzer.

NIR spectroscopy software offers different tests to validate the performance of the instrument. The most common one is a basic performance test, which tests some crucial hardware parts as well as the wavelength/wavenumber calibration and the signal to noise (S/N) of the system.

For the regulated environment, further tests according to the USP <856> guidelines are typically implemented, including photometric linearity and noise at high and low light fluxes. Instrument performance tests should be performed on a regular basis, with the frequency depending on risk assessment.

5. What sample types or parameters are not suitable for analysis with NIR spectroscopy?

Samples containing a high amount of carbon black cannot be analyzed by NIR spectroscopy because carbon black absorbs almost all NIR light.

Further, most inorganic substances have no absorbance bands in the NIR spectral region and are therefore not suitable for NIR analysis.

Find out more about the molecules and functional groups which are active in the NIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum in our previous blog post: «Benefits of NIR spectroscopy: Part 2».

Carbon black is not a suitable sample to be measured by NIR technology.

Are you looking for more spectroscopy applications? Check out the Metrohm Application Finder to download free applications across a variety of industries!

6. My industrial process is full of harsh chemicals, so manual sampling is not desirable. Is it possible to perform inline NIR analysis in hazardous areas?

Yes, and we have the right solutions for you. Metrohm not only manufactures instruments for laboratory analysis, but we also cater to the industrial process world! Metrohm Process Analytics offers two versions of process NIRS systems: the NIRS Analyzer Pro and the NIRS XDS Process Analyzer, the latter being the ideal solution for hazardous environments.

Metrohm Process Analytics offers two lines of near-infrared spectroscopic process analyzers: the NIRS Analyzer PRO and the NIRS XDS Process Analyzer.

NIRS is a robust and extremely versatile method, which enables simultaneous, «real-time» monitoring of diverse process parameters with a single measurement. The use of fiber-optics in NIRS means that the process analyzer and measuring point can be spatially separated – even by hundreds of meters if required. In fact, remote monitoring can be achieved at large distances without significant impact to S/N ratios. This is a huge advantage in environments with challenging explosion protection requirements. Fiber-optic probes and flow cells can be placed in very harmful working environments, while the spectrometer and analysis PC remain safe and secure in a shelter. When a shelter is not available, the NIRS XDS Process Analyzer can be directly placed in the hazardous area (ATEX Zone 2 or Class1Div2).

Obtain «real-time» results of your process without the need to take samples, reduce the risks of handling chemicals, and increase your profitability. Download our free brochure here for more information about safe operation of NIRS process analyzers in hazardous areas!

7. How is the maintenance of a NIRS process analyzer performed?

Maintenance is easy, fast, and not necessary to perform very often. NIRS is a reagentless analytical technique, so the only consumable to be replaced is the lamp, which needs replacement once per year.

Compared to other techniques like chromatography  (e.g., GC, IC) or titration, and also because NIR spectroscopic analysis does not degrade samples, there is no chemical waste which is produced. Additionally, thanks to our all-in-one software, automatic performance tests are performed regularly to guarantee that the analyzer is operating according to process specifications. The instrument can be left in the process without any further operator involvement. 

Metrohm Process Analytics NIRS process analyzers are maintenance-free systems that have been designed to guarantee high uptimes and low operational costs.

Are you searching for more process NIRS applications? Check out the Metrohm Application Finder to download them for free!

Want to learn more about NIR spectroscopy and potential applications? Have a look at our free and comprehensive application booklet about NIR spectroscopy.

Download our Monograph

A guide to near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of industrial manufacturing processes

Post written by Dr. Nicolas Rühl (Product Manager Spectroscopy at Metrohm International Headquarters, Herisau, Switzerland) and Dr. Alexandre Olive (Product Manager Process Spectroscopy at Metrohm Applikon, Schiedam, The Netherlands).

Frequently asked questions in near-infrared spectroscopy analysis – Part 1

Frequently asked questions in near-infrared spectroscopy analysis – Part 1

Whether you are new to the technique, a seasoned veteran, or merely just curious about near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), Metrohm is here to help you to learn all about how to perform the best analysis possible with your instruments.

In this series, we will cover several frequently asked questions regarding both our laboratory NIRS instruments as well as our line of Process Analysis NIRS products.

1. What is the difference between IR spectroscopy and NIR spectroscopy?

IR (infrared) and NIR (near-infrared) spectroscopy utilize different spectral ranges of light. Light in the NIR range is higher in energy than IR light (Figure 1), which affects the interaction with the molecules in a sample.

Electromagnetic Spectrum
Figure 1. The electromagnetic spectrum.

This energy difference has both advantages and disadvantages, and the selection of the ideal technology depends very much on the application. The higher energy NIR light is absorbed less than IR light by most organic materials, broadening the resulting bands and making it difficult to assign them to specific functional groups without mathematical processing.

However, this same feature makes it possible to perform analysis without sample preparation, as there is no need to prepare very thin layers of analyte or use ATR (attenuated total reflection). Additionally, NIRS can quantify the water content in samples up to 15%.

Want to learn more about how to perform faster quality control at lower operating costs by using NIRS in your lab? Download our free white paper here: Boost Efficiency in the QC laboratory: How NIRS helps reduce costs up to 90%.

The weaker absorption of NIR light leads to using long pathlengths for liquid measurements, which is particularly helpful in industrial process environments. Speaking of such process applications, with NIR spectroscopy, you can use long fiber optic cables to connect the analyzer to the measuring probe, allowing remote measurements throughout the process due to low absorbance of the NIR light by the fiber (Figure 2).

Electromagnetic Spectrum
Figure 2. Illustration of the long-distance measurement possibility of a NIRS process analyzer with the use of low-dispersion fiber optic cables. Many sampling options are available for completely automated analysis, allowing users to gather real-time data for immediate process adjustments.

For more information, read our previous blog post outlining the differences between infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy.

2. NIR spectroscopy is a «secondary technology». What does this mean?

To create prediction models in NIR spectroscopy, the NIR spectra are correlated with parameters of interest, e.g., the water content in a sample. These models are then used during routine quality control to analyze samples.

Values from a reference (primary) method need to be correlated with the NIR spectrum to create prediction models (Figure 3). Since NIR spectroscopy results depend on the availability of such reference values during prediction model development, NIR spectroscopy is therefore considered a secondary technology.

Electromagnetic Spectrum
Figure 3. Correlation plot of moisture content in samples measured by NIRS compared to the same samples measured with a primary laboratory method.

For more information about how Karl Fischer titration and NIR spectroscopy work in perfect synergy, download our brochure: Water Content Analysis – Karl Fischer titration and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in perfect synergy.

Read our previous blog posts to learn more about NIRS as a secondary technique.

3. What is a prediction model, and how often do I need to create/update it?

In NIR spectroscopy, prediction models interpret a sample’s NIR spectrum to determine the values of key quality parameters such as water content, density, or total acid number, just to name a few. Prediction models are created by combining sample NIR spectra with reference values from reference methods, such as Karl Fischer titration for water content (Figure 3).

A prediction model, which consists of sufficient representative spectra and reference values, is typically created once and will only need an update if samples begin to vary (for example after a change of production process equipment or parameter, raw material supplier, etc.).

Want to know more about prediction models for NIRS? Read our blog post about the creation and validation of prediction models here.

4. How many samples are required to develop a prediction model?

The number of samples needed for a good prediction model depends on the complexity of the sample matrix and the molecular absorptivity of the key parameter.

For an «easy» matrix, e.g., a halogenated solvent with its water concentration as the measurement parameter, a sample set of 1020 spectra covering the complete concentration range of interest may be sufficient. For applications that are more complex, we recommend using at least 40–60 spectra in order  to build a reliable prediction model.

Find out more about NIRS pre-calibrations built on prediction models and how they can save time and effort in the lab.

5. Which norms describe the use of NIR in regulated and non-regulated industries?

Norms describing how to implement a near-infrared spectroscopy system in a validated environment include USP <856> and USP <1856>. A general norm for non-regulated environments regarding how to create prediction models and basic requirements for near-infrared spectroscopy systems are described in ASTM E1655. Method validation and instrument validation are guided by ASTM D6122 and ASTM D6299, respectively.

Figure 4. Different steps for the successful development of quantitative methods according to international standards.

For specific measurements, e.g. RON and MON analysis in fuels, standards such as ASTM D2699 and ASTM D2700 should be followed.

For further information, download our free Application Note: Quality Control of Gasoline – Rapid determination of RON, MON, AKI, aromatic content, and density with NIRS.

6. How can NIRS be implemented in a production process?

Chemical analysis in process streams is not always a simple task. The chemical and physical properties such as viscosity and flammability of the sample streams can interfere in the analysis measurements. Some industrial processes are quite delicate—even the slightest changes to the process parameters can lead to significant variability in the properties of final products. Therefore, it is essential to measure the properties of the stream continuously and adjust the processing parameters via rapid feedback to assure a consistent and high quality product.

Figure 5. Example of the integration of inline NIRS analysis in a fluid bed dryer of a production plant.

Curious about this type of application? Download it for free from the Metrohm website!

The use of fiber optic probes in NIRS systems has opened up new perspectives for process monitoring. A suitable NIR probe connected to the spectrometer via optical fiber allows direct online and inline monitoring without interference in the process. Currently, a wide variety of NIR optical probes are available, from transmission pair probes and immersion probes to reflectance and transflectance probes, suitable for contact and non-contact measurements. This diversity allows NIR spectroscopy to be applied to almost any kind of sample composition, including melts, solutions, emulsions, and solid powders.

Selecting the right probe, or sample interface, to use with a NIR process analyzer is crucial to successful process implementation for inline or online process monitoring. Depending upon whether the sample is in a liquid, solid or gaseous state, transflectance or transmission probes are used to measure the sample, and specific fitting attachments are used to connect the probes to the reactor, tank, or pipe. With more than 45 years of experience, Metrohm Process Analytics can design the best solutions for your process. 

Visit our website to find a selection of free Application Notes to download related to NIRS measurements in industrial processes.

7. How can product quality be optimized with process NIRS?

Regular control of key process parameters is essential to comply with certain product and process specifications, and results in attaining optimal product quality and consistency in any industry. NIRS analyzers can provide data every 30 seconds for near real-time monitoring of production processes.

Figure 6. The Metrohm Process Analytics NIRS XDS Process Analyzer, shown here with multiplexer option allowing up to 9 measuring channels. Here, both microbundle (yellow) and single fiber (blue) optical cables are connected, with both a reflectance probe and transmission pair configured.

Using NIRS process analyzers is not only preferable for 24/7 monitoring of the manufacturing process, it is also extremely beneficial for inspecting the quality of raw materials and reagents. By providing data in «real-time» to the industrial control system (e.g., DCS or PLC), any process can be automated based on the NIRS data. As a result, downtimes are reduced, unforeseen situations are avoided, and costly company assets are safeguarded.

Furthermore, the included software on Metrohm Process Analytics NIRS instruments has a built-in chemometric package which allows qualification of a product even while it is still being produced. A report is then generated which can be directly used by the QC manager. Therefore, the product quality consistency is improved leading to potential added revenues.

Do you want to learn more about improving product quality with online or inline NIRS analysis? Take a look at our brochure!

In the next part, we cover even more of your burning questions regarding NIRS for lab and process measurements:

Want to learn more about NIR spectroscopy and potential applications? Have a look at our free and comprehensive application booklet about NIR spectroscopy.

Download our Monograph

A guide to near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of industrial manufacturing processes

Post written by Dr. Nicolas Rühl (Product Manager Spectroscopy at Metrohm International Headquarters, Herisau, Switzerland) and Dr. Alexandre Olive (Product Manager Process Spectroscopy at Metrohm Applikon, Schiedam, The Netherlands).